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COCKER

Jane Cocker

Don Congregational Cemetery

DEATH

COCKER – At her residence, West Devonport, on April 18, Jane, relict of the late David Cocker, in her 89th year. (Née Best).

The Advocate 19th April 1920

FUNERAL

COCKER – The funeral of the late Jane Cocker will leave her late residence, Turton Street, West Devonport, to-morrow at 11.30 a.m., and from the Congregational Church at 12 o’clock, for the Don Cemetery. No flowers, by special request. Friends kindly accept this intimation – Jeffrey, Undertaker.

The Advocate 19th April 1920

The death occurred yesterday morning at her residence, Turton Street, West Devonport, of an old and respected resident, in the person of Mrs. Jane Cocker, at the advanced age of 89 years. The deceased lady was one of the oldest residents of the district, having voyaged out from England in the year 1855, accompanied by her sister, Mrs. Winspear, Sen., now residing at East Devonport. The journey from the Old Country was made in a small sailing vessel, and few realize the hardship of such a journey in those days. Shortly after her arrival the late Mrs. Cocker, with her sister, the late Mrs. Dean, of Launceston, settled on the Mersey, where she resided up to the time of her demise – a period of 68 years. Mrs. Winspear, Sen., of East Devonport, and a sister in England are the only surviving members of the family. The funeral will leave her late residence at 11.30 a.m., and the Congregational church at 12 o’clock, for the Don cemetery.

The Advocate 19th April 1920

The funeral took place yesterday of the late Mrs. Jane Cocker, of Devonport, relict of the late Mr. David Cocker, the place of interment being the Don cemetery. The funeral was attended by a very representative gathering, including members of the Devonport Council and Mersey Marine Board and friends and relatives from different coastal centres and Launceston. The cortege first moved to the Congregational Church, where the coffin was placed on a raised dais, draped in purple and white. The Rev. J. Ebery here conducted the first part of the service, which was appropriate, as the deceased lady had worshipped in the church for nearly 60 years, and had during her lifetime made to the church a free gift of the Sunday school building. In the course of an appropriate discourse Mr. Ebery pointed out that death should not be considered the end of things, but merely one stage in existence, to be followed by burial and then resurrection. The Dead March was played by Mrs. Andrews. The chief mourners were Cr. W. B. Cocker, Messrs. J Cocker, B. D. Cocker, D. Cocker, W. D. Winspear, W. B. and T. E. Dean, and Major Samson, of Launceston.

The Advocate 21 April 1920

Clara Cocker

Bluff Pioneer Cemetery Devonport

SAD OCCURRENCE AT THE MERSEY

It is with feelings of deep regret that we chronicle the death of Mrs. D. Cocker, wife of our esteemed and respected townsman, Mr. D. Cocker, which took place early on Tuesday morning. Of late the deceased had been suffering from religious melancholy and concern for her family preyed on her mind and it is supposed led to the committal of the rash act which terminated a blameless life. Both Mr. and Mrs. Cocker have been residents of Tasmania for about 38 years (with the exception of some two years spent in Melbourne), part of that time being spent in Launceston, but latterly the deceased had lived in this portion of the island, where the whole family is held in the highest respect, Mr. Cocker having been connected with every movement for the welfare of Devonport and district, and universal regret was experienced for that gentleman on the sad facts of the death becoming known. The deceased lady had been 36 years married and leaves a large family, mostly grown up, to mourn their loss. The late Mrs. Cocker was a highly educated lady, and the best of mothers and was most self-sacrificing in her disposition. She also possessed undoubted courage and during the time of the residence of herself and husband in Melbourne (which was at the time of the gold fever in Victoria) was the means of saving the latter’s life. It appears that the lady and her husband were proceeding over Princes’ Bridge, when they met two armed men, but Mrs. Cocker kept up a constant and lively conversation and herself and husband were allowed to proceed on their way unmolested, but later the same evening a most atrocious murder was committed on the bridge. The deceased lady was a sister of Mrs. R. Winspear, Mrs. C. Best, Miss Dean and Mr. W. B. Dean and the respect in which she was held and the universal sorrow at her sad death were fully testified by the large attendance at the funeral which took place yesterday afternoon, the remains being followed to their last resting place at the Bluff Cemetery by numerous relations, besides many of the leading residents of the town and district. The service at the grave was conducted by the Rev. D. S. Lindsay, and during the solemn and impressive burial service of the Wesleyan denomination many were visibly affected, deep and profound sympathy being expressed for the husband and family in their great bereavement

The North West Post 24th April 1890

THE INQUEST

A coronial inquiry into the circumstances attending the death of Mrs. D. Cocker was held at Mrs. J. Best’s residence, on the Esplanade, West Devonport, before Mr. W. Aikenhead (coroner), and the following jury: D. A. Nichols (foreman), H. Agar, F. Kimberley, B. G. Thompson, G. N. Levy and H. A. Pratt. Jane Best deposed that she resided at West Devonport. Had seen the body of Clara Cocker, who was her sister and who had been staying with her since the previous Wednesday. Saw her alive at about 7 o’clock that (Tuesday) morning in the bedroom. Witness slept with deceased the previous night. About 7 o’clock left the room and the deceased who was in bed, appeared to be sleeping. About an hour afterwards she returned to the bedroom to see if the deceased was getting up and found the door closed. She thought this strange, as she had not closed it. On opening the door she was horrified to discover the body of the deceased suspended from the bed post by a piece of forfar, which was tightened around the deceased’s neck. Life did not appear to be quite extinct and she immediately ran downstairs and called a man named Hutton, who cut down the body. The deceased had been in a melancholy state for some few months, but had never stated she would do away with herself, but she had known the decease to have endeavored to procure bottles of poison for the purpose of taking it. The night previous the deceased had been walking up and down in an excited state and at times she thought the deceased was demented, as she always feared that harm would come to her family. A close watch had been kept on her movements except on that morning, when witness thought she was sleeping. Deceased was 57 years of age, Alexander Hutton, in the employ of Mrs. Best, deposed to having released the body of the deceased. The piece of forfar (produced) was round her neck. After he had cut her down, life to all appearance seemed to be extinct. The deceased was on her knees on the bed, with her hands by her side. The forfar was fixed to the top of the bed, which was 4ft in height from the bedclothes. From her demeanor he judged deceased was not of sound mind. Thomas K. J. Fulton, medical practitioner, residing at West Devonport, deposed that he made an external examination of the body of the deceased, and was of opinion that the cause of death was hanging, she being capable of committing the deed herself. The jury returned a verdict that the deceased, Clara Cocker, being of unsound mind killed herself by hanging.

The North West Post 24 April 1890

David Cocker

Bluff Pioneer Cemetery Devonport

DEATH

COCKER – On January 30, 1907, at his residence, Turton Street, West Devonport, David Cocker, in his 76th year.

The Advocate 1st February 1907

FUNERAL

The funeral of the late David Cocker will leave his late residence, Turton Street, West Devonport, at 2 p.m., today for the Bluff Cemetery. H. Weller, Undertaker

The Advocate 1st February 1907

Death of Mr. D. Cocker

An Esteemed Mersey Pioneer


Quite a shock was caused in Devonport yesterday afternoon when it became known that Mr. David Cocker was no more. Deceased had been visibly failing for many months and had been in feeble health, but he was about less than a week ago and had only been a day or so confined in bed. He was seen by his medical attendant on Tuesday, when he was in a weak state and yesterday afternoon the end came rather suddenly, death being due to heart failure. Sincere regret was expressed on all hands at the removal of such an estimable citizen.
Mr. Cocker was 76 years of age in September last, having been born in 1830 at Dewabury in Yorkshire, England. He came to Tasmania as a young man and could rightly be termed one of the pioneers of the Mersey district. He was interested in the coalmines that were being worked in the Tarleton and Don districts.
Mr. David Cocker first arrived in the Mersey early in 1852 in company with Mr. W. B. Dean, of Launceston. In conjunction with his brother (Benjamin Cocker) and Mr. Dean he imported the first steam sawmill plant erected in the district. Mr. Cocker then returned to Melbourne but in August of the same year came back to the Mersey and took charge of the mill, which was erected a little distance from the banks of the Mersey River and conducted it under the style of the Romney Sawmill Company (the proprietors being Messrs Cocker and Dean). They introduced the first vessels of moderate tonnage into the Mersey, purchasing the John Bull, the Freebridge. John Massey and the Wave, besides on occasion required chartering others. A few years later the mill was sold and Mr. Cocker returned to Victoria and engaged in the general provision trade, supplying the goldfields, etc., for a period of eighteen months until the great collapse in the early fifties. He once more returned to the Mersey and commenced business as general storekeeper at Spreyton and at the same time entered into farming pursuits. In about 1868 he closed his store at Spreyton and went to Launceston, where he had charge of the outside shipping business of the T.S.N. Company (under the agency of the late George Fisher). Mr. Cocker resigned his position with the company in 1884 and embarked in business on his own account as a shipping, forwarding and customs agent. Some years after, his health failing, he transferred his business to his son (Mr. B. D. Cocker) and removed to Devonport, where after a little while he once more started as a produce. Customs and general agent, continuing until 1890, when he gave it over to his son (Mr. William B. Cocker), and retired from active business life.
r. Cocker was full of reminiscences of the old days and he relates frequently an adventure he had in 1853, when he was stuck up by Dalton and Kelly, the notorious bushrangers who afterwards suffered the extreme penalty of the law.
When Formby and Torquay were amalgamated into the town of Devonport deceased was one of the first members for West Devonport and on the resignation of Mr. W. Aikenhead he was appointed chairman of the Town Board, which position he occupied during the troublesome times over the construction of the water supply. He retired from the board for several years, but in 1901 again sought a seat and was returned at the head of the poll, finally retiring from that body in 1903. He was for some years a member of the Mersey Marine Board and on the decease of the Hon J. H. McCall he was appointed Master Warden, retiring from the board a short time before it was converted from a nominee to an elective body. Mr. Cocker rendered valuable assistance on the Board of Advice and filled its chair for a few years and his interests at Barrington taking him frequently into that district, he was well able to represent the country districts on the board, continuing to do so until his last illness. On July 1, 1899, he was made a justice of the peace for the Mersey district and was one of the most regular attendants on the bench, where his integrity was specially appreciated and in his methodical style he carefully noted that proceedings of each sitting he attended. On the death of Mr. Aikenhead, M.H.A. he was appointed the Government nominee on the Mersey Licensing bench and like that gentleman, was an active member of the Chamber of Commerce. He held a large interest in the North Mount Farrell Mining Co. and as a director visited the mine and it was thought that over exertion on the trip at his advanced years hastened the stroke, which he sustained in December 1905. a staunch and respected member of the Methodist Church he filled loyally all the offices a layman could hold and nowhere will his absence be missed so sorely as by the local church, of which he was such a regular attendant.
Mr. Cocker married twice and by his first wife he had five sons and six daughters, who are all grown to maturity, his second wife was the widow of the late Mr. George Best, another of the pioneers of the Mersey.
The funeral will take place tomorrow afternoon.

The Advocate 31 January 1907

Death of Mr. D. Cocker

AN HONORABLE AND HONORED CAREER

The decease of Mr. D. Cocker, J.P., which took place at his residence, Devonport, on Wednesday, was one of the principal topics of conversation in the Northwest yesterday. Deceased’s many excellent qualities had endeared him to a very large section of the Mersey community and his patient industry and constant devotion to his various private and public duties constitute an example worthy of emulation by the rising generation. Flags were half-masted at Devonport in token of sympathy with the bereaved family, and general acknowledgment was made of his genuine worth as a citizen, whilst his determination to work to the last was recognized as a fitting conclusion to a long and strenuous life. The funeral leaves the house, Turton Street, West Devonport, at 2 p.m. to day, and after a religious service in the Methodist Church, interment will take place at the Bluff cemetery.

The Advocate 1st February 1907

A BARRINGTON TRIBUTE

A Barrington correspondent writes:-

Universal expressions of regret were to be heard when it became known that Mr. D. Cocker had passed away. His keen interest in our district was widely recognized, and also his sterling worth in public and private life. He took an active and intelligent part in educational and religious matters, and the Methodist Church has lost an earnest and faithful worker. In conjunction with his sons he took up a selection here many years ago, and the farm now known as "Northbury," is one of the best managed in the district, a monument to heavy work and business enterprise. The sympathy of the entire district will go out to the bereaved family. For years deceased was a member of the Tarleton Road Trust, and was one of the strongest supporters of the construction of Esplanade Road from Spreyton to Devonport, which has proved such a boon to this and other districts, and also a benefit to Devonport. Looking back, it seems strange that any opposition should have been offered to this useful work, but Mr. Cocker who, with Mr. J. Acklin, represented the trust on the joint committee to make the road, had the satisfaction later of knowing that many of its stoutest opponents had candidly acknowledged its advantages and admitted that Mr. Cocker and his party were in the right.

The Advocate 1st February 1907

OBITUARY

Mr. David Cocker

Another of the pioneers of Devonport passed over to the great majority yesterday, when the death occurred of Mr. David Cocker, who, if he was not the first settler in Devonport (the Mersey it was in those days), was certainly one of the earliest of those who foresaw the future importance of the district. He was also one of the few of the pioneers who lived to see Devonport attain its present enviable position as one of the three chief towns in Tasmania and the second port in the State. This must have been very gratifying to him when we recall the fact that he and his brother, Benjamin, really laid the foundation of the port by establishing a regular line of ships between Devonport and the mainland about 1851 with the ketches John Bull and Wave. The history of the late Mr. Cocker is to a large extent also the history of Devonport, for until recently he was an active public worker in the affairs of the town, and there was scarcely a public body with which he was connected. Exactly how much work he did for Devonport will never be known, but the record he leaves behind is one of which his people may justly be proud. It is a record of singular energy and determined perseverance, which only those who lived in the early days of the colony can understand or fully appreciate. Mr. Cocker was born at Dalton, in the west riding of Yorkshire, and arrived in Tasmania on January 1, 1850. The same ship which brought him to the island also brought out the charter changing the name of Van Dieman’s Land to Tasmania. At the time of Mr. Cocker’s arrival in the colony convicts were still numerous, indeed the stories which the late Mr. Cocker could tell of those stirring days are worthy of recording in the history of the island, as many of them already have been. They were the days of the penal settlement, of chain gangs in the streets and of challenges by armed sentries after sundown. But the chief events of Mr. Cocker’s career are those, which more closely concern the Mersey district. Shortly after coming to Tasmania, Mr. Cocker went to Victoria where he established a business. About 1852, at the request of his brother Benjamin, he came back to Tasmania and acquired an interest in a sawmill near Spreyton, on which he spent large sums of money. He also assisted in building a tramline to the coalfields at Spreyton, but both of these ventures proved failures. Somewhere about this time he had a business at Cocker’s Creek and took up land at the Mersey. He floated timber down to the river to where Devonport is now situated, and shipped it away to Victoria. It is difficult to realize that the progressive town and fine port of Devonport did not exist at that period. It was thick, almost impenetrable bush, with trees growing down the river on both sides. It is an instance of the determination of the settlers of those days, that they could carve holes and fortunes out of those wilds. Of labour there was very little, mostly rough, dangerous ticket-of-leave men, some of whom would quickly relieve a settler of his money and his life at the same time. One experience of Mr. Cocker’s was being chained to a tree by the notorious bushrangers, Dalton and Kelly, when they were escaping to Victoria, where they were afterwards caught and hanged. From these early days Mr. Cocker saw Devonport grow, or, rather, helped it to grow. It was he who wrote to Governor Denison and had the Mersey proclaimed a port of entry and clearance, and it was also he who fought in the face of strong opposition for what is now the Esplanade-road, at that time the only road leading into the town. The districts of Spreyton and Barrington are also indebted to him for their first roads. He was one of the first members of the Devonport Town Board, on the amalgamation of Torquay and Formby and at one time was chairman. He and the late Mr. Aikenhead claimed to be the founders of the water scheme, which has proved to be a great success to Devonport. He was also for many years a member of the Tarleton Road Trust. It was but natural that Mr. Cocker should have been a member of the Marine Board, in view of his early connection with the shipping of Devonport, and his term as Master Warden was marked by a most successful year. For years he was closely identified with the Board of Advice, the Licensing Bench and many other public bodies, while his name will be recorded as one of the biggest workers in the cause of Methodism in this part of the island. He was also president of the local branch of Freetrade Association and a director of the North Mount Farrell Mining company. He was in his 76th year and leaves a family of eleven. The funeral takes place on Friday. A service will first be held in the Steele-street Methodist church and the cortege will then leave for the Bluff cemetery.

The North West Post 31st January 1907

THE LATE DAVID COCKER

IN MEMORIAM SERVICE

A service in memoriam of the late Mr. David Cocker was conducted in the Steele Street Methodist Church last night by the Rev. W. H. Hodge. There was a large congregation representatives being present from the Devonport Town Board, Mersey Marine Board, Board of Advice, Police Department and other bodies with which the late Mr. Cocker was connected. The pulpit was draped in black, while the lesson selected was deceased’s favourite reading, Psalm 27. Appropriate prayers and hymns were rendered. “The Christian’s Goodnight,” being sung, kneeling, at the cone us on of the address and the anthem. “Who are There in White Raiment?” was also given. The organist Miss Dusting played “The Vital Spark,” as the offertory voluntary and Mendelsohn’s “Dead March in Saul,” A recessional. In lieu of a sermon, Mr. Hodge, after giving a resume of deceased’s secular career (which has already appeared in these columns) read the following biography, which he had prepared of the late Mr. Cocker’s connection with the church. Mr. David Cocker’s connection with the Methodist Church of Devonport and district dates back over 50 years. His past official appointment as a circuit officer was made in the June quarterly meeting of 1866, when he was appointed society steward for Sherwood. He attended the first quarterly meeting on September 24, 1866, under the chairmanship of the late rev. G. T. Heyward. At that meeting he was appointed to organize a society class at Sherwood. At the following December quarterly meeting he was appointed junior circuit steward and a year later was appointed senior circuit steward, a position he filled with credit to himself and benefit to the circuit. In the year, which followed, he was on several occasions appointed to this highest office in the church, finally retiring on the January 3 1906. He was also one of the original trustees of the Formby property, now known as the Steele-street Methodist Church. He was treasurer of the trust and in his capacity rendered valuable service. It is not too much to say that the commanding position the Methodist Church holds in Devonport can be traced very largely to his wise administration and liberal financial support. It is a common sentiment that the higher a man climbs in the temporal and social scale the further he gets from the thrill and burden of work, especially in connection with the work of God. Mr. Cocker believed that God’s law expresses and exacts the very opposite conclusion and that the Almighty looks for the best servants of humanity, not among the necessitous at the bottom, but among the free and favoured at the top. Hence everyday found “Something attempted, something done, to earn the night’s repose.” It was a tradition of ancient Thebes that from the hour of his election the Archon never allowed the consecrated spear to pass from his hand. Early in youth Mr. Cocker consecrated himself to the service of Jesus Christ and for over sixty years he wielded the spear with vigour and success. Much of his success can be traced to his boundless optimism. He believed in the greatness and grandeur of life and this belief coloured the whole of his conduct. He never allowed unfavourable environment to interfere with enterprise and the story of his success notwithstanding conditions of trial and difficulty reads like a romance. In this age when pessimism has become the creed of so many lives it is inspiring to turn to one like Mr. Cocker who was lifted above its fogs and mists ...to clear heights above, where the breezes play and where the sunlight falls. What the world needs to day is the gospel of faith and hope and courage, the cheery optimism that sings with Browning

“The years is at the spring,
And day’s at the morn;
Morning’s at seven;
The hillside’s dew-pearled;
The lark’s on the wing;
The snail’s on the thorn;
God’s in His heaven;
All’s right with the world!”

Now, the man who believes that as Mr. Cocker did, honestly and fearlessly, will never fail in the struggle of life, on the contrary, he will go forth into life’s battle with a brave heart and by strenuous endeavor will make life what God meant it to be, a blessing and a benediction. Mr. Cocker’s success is proof of the fact that, lying at the very foundation of all true enterprise, is an unswerving belief in the greatness of life and its far-reaching possibilities; in its undeveloped powers and in its ultimate triumph over conditions which are considered unfavourable. No man can make life great and successful who is unthankful for the gift, and regrets that he was ever born. Our faith marks the measure of possible attainment hence... is that the Christian man like David Cocker is the highest type of man. And why? Simply because of his faith and personal trust in Christ. I am old fashioned enough to believe that no life can be complete without Christ, that no salvation can be had, except through Christ and that no victory can be won except by the power of Christ, that no heaven can be ours except we are helped there by the grace of Christ. From a practical illustration one thinks of David Cocker. This was the secret of all his power, the secret of his unselfish, strenuous life, his faith in the living personal Christ. He was 75 when he died. That is by our method of counting the years by the revolutions for the hearty, by the rising and setting of the sun. By this standard we can count the years of a man’s life, but we cannot measure the silent influences that go out and abide forever. From the narrow standpoint of the materialist, viewing the brief span of mortal life in comparison with all the ages of the past and with the immeasurable sweep of eternity, then indeed it is but as a shadow upon the dial. Our 75 years are but as a tick of the mighty pendulum of eternity. But, viewing life in the light of God’s revaluation looking at it with the light of eternity streaming upon it, then life is immortal. One cannot bring it within the compass of years. As one looked upon his mortal remains in the narrow coffin bed, one thought of Longfellow’s lines:- “And the body lay a worn out pillar, that the soul had broken and cast away.” Mr. Cocker was extremely methodical. Even the smallest details of his life were carefully recorded. Reading his diary one was impressed with his thought for his family. They, of course, were his chief concern, but many a man lives today to thank God for generous help rendered in time of need by David Cocker. On leaving England his father presented him with a copy of the Bible. This was his constant companion for 56 years. Mr. Hodge produced this Bible and read aloud the inscription therein. If a creed is to be judged by the kind of life it produces, then the creed Mr. Cocker believed in was divine. What a swift and scathing reproof to those who would confine the operations of God’s regenerative and perfecting grace to the narrow radius of their own communion. God has his saints in all the churches and David Cocker was one. While liberally tolerant to other branches of the Christian church, his love for his own amounted to a passion. Largely through his strong consistent example, Methodism remains a force for righteousness in this town and district. To his minister he was a true friend and wise counselor and outside his family none will miss him more. He excelled as a hearer and the preachers loved to see him in the congregation. Instinctively one felt that there was one at least who was praying for him, one who followed with sympathetic interest the unfolding of the theme and whose appreciation was often audibly expressed. His nature was like the granite of his native Yorkshire moors, but about 4 years ago he ventured under a shower bath, which unfortunately had a very injurious physical effect. From this he partially rallied and although for some time he was in indifferent health it was not to the extent of causing his relatives any immediate concern. He was still able to go about and his fervour for his life’s work was as manifest as ever. Some weeks ago he contracted influenza, from which he never properly recovered, although he insisted in going about as usual. On Monday last marked indications of serious illness became apparent and acting under medical advice, he kept to his room. On Tuesday afternoon I saw him for the last time. Mentally he was very alert, but I noticed what I believed were portents of death. That afternoon he opened his heart to me and conversed freely on the value of divine discipline and when I prayed his responses were hearty and many. Before leaving he manifested his interest in the work of God by asking me to see that his annual subscription to the Foreign Mission was paid. His faith in God was strong. There was not a cloud in the sky of his spiritual experience. All through my life I will carry with me the memory of that sacred hour, the patience he manifested in suffering. The rapture with which he regarded the future state created a profound impression. It not infrequently happens, as it undoubtedly did that aftern0oon, that the good man who instinctively knows death is approaching has a clearer vision and a firmer grip on the mysteries of life than one in conscious enjoyment of physical vitality. In the last solemn hours when God’s hills of eternity are within sight and those strong and restless passions that confuse the spiritual vision grew strangely still and yield to a peace which is heavenly in the light of the eternal future, the dying saint sees the insignificance of everything that is not immortal, then problems that formerly seemed strange and mysterious are solved. Dealings that appeared meaningless become instinct with reality and life’s discipline is understood. This I am confident was the experience in those last hours of David Cocker. On Wednesday afternoon alarming symptoms manifested themselves and resting on his daughter Annie, who in her extremity could only say, “Father, dear father. Jesus! Jesus!” and with the sweetest of all names sounding in his ears, the most picturesque and possibly the most noted figure in our midst passed peacefully away. Although the end came with a suddenness unexpected, yet we may fall back on the old great words of Socrates and say, “that he who has arranged his soul in her proper jewels of moderation and justice and courage and nobleness and truth is ever ready for the journey whenever and wherever the call comes.” We speak of him now as dead. Rather we should speak of him as alive forever more. Life is not broken off by death. Life is forever ascending. This is finely put by the Quaker poet Whittier:- “But he shall on and upward go, the eternal step of progress beats to that great anthem calm and deep, which God repeats.” Take heart, the Master builds again. A charmed life old goodness hath. “The tares may perish but the grain is not for death.” There was a Peruvian Admiral who in one of their naval battles went down with his flagship and every year when the roll is called, his name is called and the answer is always the same. “Absent but accounted for is present with the heroes.” So the memory of Mr. Cocker will never be allowed to die out. This church, the public institutions of the town and district will prove permanent memorials of a good and essentially great man. The funeral on Friday afternoon was an eloquent testimony to the worth of a long and honourable life. Mr. Cocker was so widely known and respected by all sections of the church that representatives from all the denominations were present at the graveside to pay the last tribute of respect to one who was so greatly revered for his goodness of heart and purity of life.

The North West Post 4th February 1907

NEWS ITEM

One of the oldest residents of Devonport Mr. David Cocker, celebrated the jubilee of his arrival on New Years Day with his sons and daughters and family connections, making up a goodly assemblage. Mr. Cocker arrived here on January 1, 1851 and has been a resident or connected with the district ever since.

The Advocate 4th January 1901

Clara Cocker

Bluff Pioneer Cemetery Devonport

Age 54 years

FUNERAL

The funeral of the late Miss Clara Cocker will leave the Devonport Railway Station at 2.15 p.m. This Day (Saturday) for the place of interment, the Bluff cemetery. H. Weller, Undertaker

The North West Post 12th March 1910

General regret was expressed through out the town yesterday when the sad intelligence became know of the death of Miss Clara Cocker, who passed away in her sleep yesterday morning at Launceston. The deceased was the eldest daughter of the late Mr. David Cocker, who was one of the earliest settlers in Devonport, and was a native of Victoria. She was about 54 years of age, and lived practically all her life in the Barrington district, where she was well known and highly esteemed. She took an interest in social and church matters, and was at one time organist at the Methodist Church. She made many friends and was always willing to render assistance in time of need, and her demise will be much regretted. She leaves a large circle of relations in Devonport and Launceston, also a brother and a sister in America to mourn their loss and sincere sympathy will be felt for the relatives in their sad and sudden bereavement. The funeral will take place at the Bluff cemetery today, leaving Devonport railway station at 2.15 p.m.

The North West Post 12th March 1910

The funeral of the late Miss Clara Cocker took place at the Bluff cemetery on Saturday afternoon, and was attended by a representative gathering. The immediate mourners were Messrs. B. D., W. B., David, and Jos. Cocker (brothers), J. Deane and W. D. Winspear (cousins). The service was conducted by the Rev. M. Lawther.

The North West Post 14th March 1910

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